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Author: EverSpark

With roots dating back to Ancient Greece, the legal profession has been around a long time. While many legal theories remain the same, marketing practices have evolved quite a bit. Today, many legal questions can be answered with a quick online search. Yet millions of people still need legal services every year. Rather than replace lawyers, search engines and other online resources have made firms more visible than ever. At the same time, many law firms have misconceptions about the most effective ways to market themselves online. They may think that traditional media advertising is the only way to go, or they may think they

SEO for law firms is about more than improving your rank. While search engine optimization may seem like it's solely focused on getting your law firm to coveted page one spots, a top rank doesn't matter if you can't convert visitors into clients. With great SEO, the right audiences will organically discover your content and also be convinced that your legal services are a good fit for their needs. That involves building trust and communicating value. Both are accomplished in subtle ways, and all of these techniques can be encompassed by the larger disciplines that SEO teaches. So, what can your law firm do to

Injury victims, businesses, and others seeking legal services have more options than ever to choose from. This means that the client pool has spread to become relatively shallow, as well as fiercely competitive.  Recent research cited by Bloomberg Law reveals that demand for legal services increased in both 2018 and 2019. This is the first time the industry has seen two consecutive years of growth since the Great Recession of 2009. However, the report notes that the majority of the revenue growth came from increased billing rates. Meanwhile, firm headcounts grew by just two percent while productivity shrank by one percent. Reports like these paint